The Joys of Adopting a Senior Dog

You have decided to adopt a pet. Perfect. You’ll help a pet in need while bringing joy to you and your family. But a new question arises. Should you adopt a puppy or an adult dog? Most often, people choose a puppy. It’s an opportunity to start from scratch with your new pet and watch them grow. However, raising a puppy requires a lot of commitment. You have to feed them several times a day, after which you have to immediately take them out for a walk so that they eliminate appropriately and become house-trained as soon as possible. They are energetic, noisy, and often destructive (watch your shoes). They will wake you up during the night until they get used to their new home. And that’s why in the following text, we talk about the joys of adopting a senior dog and the benefits it has for you.

At what age is a dog considered senior?
What exactly does senor dog mean? In most cases, if a dog is older than seven years old, it is considered a senior. However, the biological age of dogs depends on the breed. In fact, from breed size, to be more precise. Smaller dogs have a longer lifespan and enter their senior phase later. In larger dogs, life expectancy is shorter, so signs of aging can be seen earlier. The last 25% of a dog’s expected life span can be considered the older stage of life. But as with people, age is just a number. Most senior dogs are in excellent health and still not burdened with medical problems and are ready for the new joint adventures that await you.

Why do older dogs end up in shelters?
People often wonder why the dog ended up in the shelter in the first place. Maybe he was
problematic, so the previous owners gave him up. It is often the reason people hesitate to adopt a senior dog. However, these dogs most often end up in shelters because of the following:
● Death of the dog’s original parent
● Financial or health problems that make taking care of the dog no longer possible
● Moving to a place where dogs were not allowed
● The dog got lost and marked as a “stray”
Most of these dogs are in this situation due to unfortunate circumstances. Each of them deserves the love that he will return to you many times over and bring joy to your life. It is a beautiful feeling to watch your puppy grow, but consider that other older animals are struggling and deserve love.

By adopting a senior dog, you save a life
When you decide to adopt a dog, it means you saved his life. This is especially true for older dogs. According to available data, only 25% of older dogs are adopted, compared to 60% of younger dogs and puppies. Approximately 6.3 million pets enter American shelters for animals across the country every year. Every year, about 920,000 animals get euthanized. Of that number, 390,000 are dogs, mostly in elder age.

Older dogs are housebroken
Senior dogs are usually well-behaved since their previous owner has already taught them good
manners. If you adopt one, it’s most likely that you won’t have any trouble with them. They
already know where to urinate. If, by some chance, they don’t, it’s much easier to teach them than a much messier, restless younger dog. Senior dogs are much more adaptable. For example, it’s much less challenging to prepare them for a move if you’re planning to do so.

Older dogs have a calmer temperament
If you are looking for a calmer dog, selecting an older one may be the right decision. The
puppies are curious and impatient to investigate the world around them. They are full of energy they have to spend in some way. Your shoes and furniture will most likely pay the price. Older dogs still have plenty of energy but are not destructive. They are great company for walks or road trips. They are easier to adapt to new situations and the environment. If you have to change your residence with an older dog, it shouldn’t be too difficult for them to adapt to the new environment. For example, if you are moving to
LA and hiring residential movers, you can rely on skilled experts to help you safely and comfortably move with your pets.

What you see is what you get
When adopting a dog from a shelter, you will likely be in a position to choose a mixed-breed
dog. In that case, if you are choosing a puppy, you won’t be able to be sure how much it will eventually grow. If you have limited space available or don’t want a large dog, this can become a problem. By adopting a senior dog, you avoid this problem. They won’t grow any bigger, and the collars and clothes you buy won’t eventually get too small. Also, by choosing an adult, you get an insight into his temperament and personality. What’s more, you can describe to the shelter employees what personality traits you expect from the dog you are adopting, and they will help you choose the right one.

Creating a deep bond
Being around people all the time, senior dogs are social in most cases. Unfortunately, there are times when these dogs were tortured in the past, so they don’t like human company. But, all of them only want to be loved and cared for and are only driven by fear when they bark or show aggressive behavior. Dogs are, in general, intelligent creatures. They feel gratitude, respect, and love just as humans do. If you offer a senior dog another chance in life, they will reward you with thankfulness, which creates a stronger relationship between you two. Older dogs have developed personalities, so you”ll learn their boundaries – what they like and don’t. If you show them respect, they will respect and love you twice as much.

Conclusion
Choosing an older dog can be risky. Over time, it can develop health problems. They may not
stay with you as long as a puppy would, and saying goodbye is never easy. But the joys of
adopting a senior dog are incomparably greater. Incredible experiences await you and your new friend you have given a chance for a new life.

Meta Description:
Are you looking to adopt a dog? If you are, you should definitely choose a senior dog. And here are the
joys of adopting a senior dog.
Focus Keyphrase: adopting a senior dog
Photo: https://www.pexels.com/photo/short-coated-tan-dog-2253275/

No comment yet, add your voice below!


Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *