Now’s the Time to Launch Your Pet Care Business

Pacific Pups Rescue is finding homes for needy dogs. Learn how you can make a difference.

People love pets, and they always have. That’s why the pet care industry will always thrive,
even in times of economic uncertainty. If you’re an animal lover with an entrepreneurial spirit,
starting a pet care business could be the perfect way to make a living doing what you love.
But as with any industry, you will need to prepare well and strategize your arrival into the market
if you hope to succeed long-term. Below are a few pet care business ideas and some
fundamental tips for getting started!
Pet Boarding
If you start a pet boarding business, StartingYourBusiness.com notes that you’ll need to handle
an array of tasks. But if you are up for the challenge and have a passion for animals, the variety
of your pet boarding responsibilities can keep your day-to-day interesting.

As an owner or attendant, you will take on the responsibility of housing, feeding, administering
medication, and exercising pets. You will also need to keep each kennel as clean as possible.
Pet Sitting
As the name suggests, pet sitting is essentially the same as babysitting, except you are caring
for pets instead of babies. As a pet sitter, you will be able to choose the animals you look after
as well as whether you keep them in your home or the owner’s. Feeding, playing, and walking
are common tasks to expect. And if you excel at all of your responsibilities, you can quickly build
a loyal client base and a flourishing business that revolves around hanging out with pets!
Dog Walking
Perhaps the simplest type of business on this list, dog walking can serve as the perfect side gig
or introduction into other areas of the pet care industry. It’s all about keeping dogs exercised
and healthy. You would be taking busy people’s pups for regular walks each week, which would
be an excellent opportunity to improve your fitness routine too!
There are several ways to become a dog walker, such as:
● Start a private dog walking business.
● Sign up for a beginner dog walking app.
● Join an existing company.
Dog walking is quite simple, but you must know about state laws and learn how to handle dogs
with various needs and temperaments.
Dog Grooming
If you have a creative streak and love animals, becoming a dog groomer could be right up your alley. Many hairstylists start dog grooming businesses because they find it to be more fun and
fulfilling. You could start a private service out of your home, launch a mobile grooming service,
or rent or purchase commercial space. You can also let your furry clients relax in a cozy pre-
made residential dog kennel in between being dropped off and picked up.
Fundamental Business Tips
Whatever type of pet care business you choose to start, you will need to come at it with a
strategy. For example, it’s never too early to think about how you will receive payment from
customers. These days, you stand a greater chance of making a profit if you accept payments
through your website or app. With a bank account balance API, you can verify in real time
whether your customers have the capital to cover payments, and your customers can avoid
overdraft fees if they don’t have the necessary funds.

You will also need to write a detailed business plan that outlines the steps you will take in the
coming months and years. And if you want to quickly establish a reputation in your community,
Novarize suggests learning marketing basics, such as building a website, designing a logo, and
promoting through social media, email marketing, and paid ads. Look for some free or low-cost
tools to help. For example, you can use an online logo generator to create a memorable and
attractive logo. Select a logo template and then adapt it to your design needs.
There are many possibilities for starting a business if you wish to make a living taking care of
pets. Consider the ideas above, and make sure you are prepared for the business side of
things. You could be hanging out with your new four-legged companions and adding joy and fulfillment to your life in no time!

 

by Aurora James of dogetiquette.info

Image via Pexels

What To Do When Your Pet Has Cancer

Hearing that your pet has cancer can hit just as hard as hearing that same sad news from one
of our two-legged friends. Today’s post from Pacific Pups Rescue covers some of the basics of
what to do if your pet has cancer. Keep in mind that no single article on the internet can help
you fully prepare, so it is always best to talk to your veterinarian if you have additional
questions.

Understand the Issue
First and foremost, your responsibility lies with yourself and accepting that cancer is a common
occurrence in pets. There was likely nothing you could have done to have prevented your
beloved pet’s illness. Cancer in animals is so common, in fact, that there is an entire
organization – the Veterinary Cancer Society – dedicated to its research and elimination.

Let the Learning Begin
There are many different types of cancer that affect animals. A few are more common than
others, however, with mast cell tumors, melanoma, lymphoma, bone cancer, and
hemangiosarcoma being more prevalent than others. Once you find out which form of cancer
you are dealing with, you will be in a better position to help your animal through the process.

Get to Know the Treatment Options

Treating a pet with cancer is similar to helping a human recover or receive palliative care. Often,
surgery is the first line of attack, and this may be coupled with chemo or radiation therapy. Pet Care Oncology also explains that immunotherapy cryotherapy and radioactive iodine may be
possible treatments in some animals. For animals in the advanced stages of their disease,
comfort treatment may be all you can provide. Full-spectrum CBD oil, anti-inflammatories,
sedatives, and other medicines and homeopathic treatments prescribed by your veterinarian
can all assist with pain management.

Keep the Love Coming
Many people are afraid to show physical affection to their animals for fear that it will exacerbate
pain. Fortunately, as more and more pet owners are becoming aware of the issue, there is a
greater understanding of how, exactly, to interact with a sick pet. Do not forgo quality time
together. Instead, look for activities that enhance your pet’s life without causing them any undue
stress or strain. One example is to go for a short walk in lieu of playing catch. Similarly, you may
purchase them comfort items, such as a pet ramp to go in and out of the house or an orthopedic dog bed to reduce discomfort on aching bones and joints.

Create a Healthier Environment
Another great thing you can do for your pet is maintain the yard and remove allergens from the
home. You might also want to add a fence (if you don’t already have one) to keep your dog in
your yard – and prevent other animals from bothering them. This gives them somewhere to play
and feel safe. This also has an added benefit for the owner since certain upgrades to your home
can even raise your home’s value.

Watch Their Diet
Just like humans, discomfort during cancer or its related treatment may be heightened by a poor
diet. While it may be necessary to make some adjustments so that your animal’s weight stays in
check, most experts believe that quickly and unexpectedly switching foods – even if it is a
healthier option – may cause more harm than good. Changing your animal’s; food without a
transitional period can lead to gastrointestinal disturbances, which are already painfully common
during cancer treatment.
Your pet is a part of your family. And just because they are sick does not mean that you cannot
continue to give them all the love you have in your heart. But it’s a good idea to get to know the
type of cancer they have, provide care when they need it, and avoid the temptation to blame
yourself. Remember, there is no replacing man’s best friend. One final piece of advice is to seek
out a pet loss support group nearby so that you will have a network in place to help you through
the hardest part of your pet’s diagnosis, particularly if it is incurable.

by Aurora James of dogetiquette.info

Image via Pexels

How To Be An Advocate For Animals In Need

If you’re a Southern California animal lover, it can be difficult to see animals who are
neglected, abandoned, or in distress. Fortunately, there are numerous ways ways you can
help. The following guide offers some suggestions to consider.
Volunteer
Shelters and animal welfare agencies are overbooked and understaffed. You can help
by offering your time your time in the following ways:
● Cleaning kennels, bathing animals, and providing physical, emotional, and
mental stimulation.
● Participating in animal adoption fairs fairs.
● Helping with publicity efforts, like taking pictures of animals up for adoption and
posting them online.
● SPCA LA has numerous opportunities to help — you can find them here
Donate
Animal rescues are always in need of funds, not only to feed and shelter animals but to
provide medical care and keep their facilities operational.
● Make cash donations.
● Sponsor an animal’s medical care care or food bill.
● Host a fundraiser and donate the proceeds.
● Great Nonprofit has a vetted list list of non-profit animal welfare agencies in need of
monetary support.
Start Your Own Non-Profit
While it’s not the easiest path toward helping neglected animals, starting a nonprofit can
have a big impact once established. Here are a few start-up priorities:
● Select a name and identify a board of directors.
● File articles of incorporation.
● Obtain tax ID numbers.
● Register as a charity, open a bank account, and create business cards.

Be An Advocate

One of the most important things you can do to support neglected and homeless
animals is to be a vocal advocate.
● Use your social media accounts to promote animal welfare and agencies that
help them.
● Repost information on local shelter and rescue needs.
● Encourage friends and family to adopt or foster rather than buy pets.
● Report animal abuse and neglect to the proper authorities.
Animals are innocents who have no way to protect themselves, and they count on
humans to be kind, caring, and compassionate. Your work on their behalf can be a
wonderful way to give back to your community, bond with friends and family, and make
an important and measurable difference.

One of the most important things you can do to support neglected and homeless
animals is to be a vocal advocate.
● Use your social media accounts to promote animal welfare and agencies that
help them.
● Repost information on local shelter and rescue needs.
● Encourage friends and family to adopt or foster rather than buy pets.
● Report animal abuse and neglect to the proper authorities.
Animals are innocents who have no way to protect themselves, and they count on
humans to be kind, caring, and compassionate. Your work on their behalf can be a
wonderful way to give back to your community, bond with friends and family, and make
an important and measurable difference.
Photo by Pixabay

by Aurora James of dogetiquette.info

Wondering if You Should Foster a Dog? Yes – And Here’s How!

Note: This is an abbreviated version of an article originally published on K9 of Mine, re-published here with permission. You can read the original piece “How to Become a Dog Foster: Providing a Temporary Home for Canines in Need!” at K9 of Mine.

Fostering a dog is a great way to help out shelter dogs in need – plus it allows you to spend time with a great four-footer without the full lifetime commitment of adopting a pet. 

Every dog deserves a place where they can feel loved and cared for while waiting for their forever home!

Becoming a foster dog parent is incredibly rewarding, but there are a few things into consideration before committing to taking in a shelter pup in need. Don’t worry – we’ll explain everything you need to know!

How Do Fosters Help Shelter Dogs? 

Becoming a dog foster is one of the most impactful things you can do for a local shelter. Foster homes are in need for a variety of reasons including: 

1. Shelter space is tight, and fosters can free up room

Fostering a dog allows a dog to move into your home, freeing up room at rescue organizations — including both “kill” and “no-kill” shelters — so that your local shelter or rescue can take in more dogs who need help. Without caring foster homes, many shelters would be unable to take in new animals. This can result in neglectful owners dumping dogs on highways, or worse.

2. Foster can provide hospice care

For poor pups on their last leg, a dog foster can provide a warm, loving, caring environment for the dog to spend his final days. No dog deserves to leave this world in a stressful, loud shelter environment.

3. Fosters provide a safe space for puppies (until they’re old enough to be adopted)

Foster homes allow puppies to grow up in a relaxing environment, away from the noise and chaos of shelter life. Puppies are like little sponges, and spending their first months on earth in a stressful shelter environment can have a significant and undesirable impact on their disposition as adult dogs. 

A shelter provides minimal chances for exposure and puppy socialization with the larger world, which can result in a fearful, nervous adult dog. 

Fostering a litter of puppies can mean setting up a whole group of dogs for success! 

4. Fosters allow shy dogs to blossom

Shy and timid dogs desperately require a quiet, peaceful environment to help blossom and come out of their shells. Dog fosters allow sensitive canines to get away from the loud kennel environment and provide these pooches with the patience and care needed to feel safe and show their true colors. 

Foster parents of shy dogs will want to focus on building the dog’s confidence through various exercises and gentle training activities to help a nervous dog feel more at-ease and sure of themselves.

5. Fosters provide extra care to sick dogs while they recover

Dogs recovering from sickness or injury are often placed in a foster home to help the dog heal and recover more quickly while also keeping the shelter hygienic and limit the risk of exposure to other dogs. 

6. Fosters can collect more information about a dog’s behavior and demeanor in a home setting

Foster homes offer an excellent opportunity for shelters to better understand a dog’s behavior and general habits. How does a dog handle cats, other dogs, or kiddos? Is the dog potty trained? Does he like toys? Does he prefer to be left alone or is he a huge cuddle bug?

Collecting this information for the shelter will allow the organization to share this info with would-be adopters and help a dog get matched with his perfect home. 

7. Fosters provide a haven if shelters become temporarily unable to care for animals

If a shelter is affected by a natural disaster, canine foster parents can help keep dogs safe temporarily while the shelter is repaired and made habitable. 

Ultimately, foster homes give dogs a better place to live. Dogs in foster homes receive much more individualized attention and care than they might otherwise receive in a crowded shelter.

Many dogs behave much better in a quiet foster home than they do in a shelter, thereby increasing the chances that they’ll find a forever family. 

Fostering a Dog: The Good and the Bad 

Fostering a dog is like any other experience, with advantages and disadvantages. Let’s explore some of the key pros and cons.

Pros of Fostering:

  • You get to spend time with a dog. The best part of fostering is that you get to spend time with a new furry friend! You will be helping the dog grow into their best self, which can be very fulfilling.
  • You’ll be supporting your local animal shelter. One of the greatest advantages in fostering a dog is the help it will provide in supporting your local shelter. Shelters and rescue groups rely on the generosity of animal fosters in order to help dogs in need and free up space. This is a great way to support your local community!
  • You’ll help a dog find their forever home. Fostering can feel bittersweet at times, but there’s nothing more rewarding than handing off your foster dog to his forever family, knowing you made a pivotal impact on a pup who needed help.
  • Foster dogs can keep your own dog company. Foster dogs are an awesome way to give your own pup some company (if you have a pet at home). In some cases, having another dog in the home can be a game-changer for dogs suffering from separation anxiety (although it won’t be a fix for all dogs). Foster dogs are also a great option for anyone who is not quite ready for the lifetime commitment of a pet, but wants to give dog ownership a trial run.

Cons of Fostering:

  • Saying goodbye can be tough. When it’s time for a dog to move on to their forever home, saying goodbye can be emotionally difficult. While this can feel sad, you can be happy knowing it was YOU who helped a dog in need find a wonderful home. 
  • You’re financially responsible for your foster. It’s your financial responsibility to take care of your furry foster friend. Foster dogs require food, basic medical care, as well as a comfy bed and toys. In some cases, you may need additional gear like a crate or additional equipment depending on the dog’s needs. Shelters usually help out with basic care, but you’ll need to invest at least some cash in your foster dog’s proper care. Caring for a dog also requires a significant time commitment, so make sure you have time in your schedule to pay proper attention to your foster pup.
  • Foster dogs aren’t always easy to care for. Shelters and rescue groups do their best to provide fosters with information regarding a dog’s background, but in many cases shelter dogs come with an unknown history. Some have challenging issues, such as living formerly as a yard-only dog, or other past trauma that can make life difficult for them. Be ready to show kindness and compassion towards your canine guest, and help them adjust to their new life while preparing for a better future.

What Does a Dog Foster Do?

Dog fosters are wonderful people who make a huge difference in the lives of dogs. Dog fosters play a big part in giving shelter dogs a good life, while also making room in shelters so more dogs can be saved from being put down.

But what – on a day-to-day basis – does a dog foster parent do?

In addition to basic caretaking responsibilities, dog fosters will be responsible for the following:

Basic training and manners. Ideally, you’ll spend some time teaching your foster dog basic manners and obedience training for in-the-home. This isn’t required, but it’s highly recommended and part of what’s expected of a responsible foster. This may involve potty training, basic commands like sit and stay, etc. Some shelters will even cover the cost of classes for you to learn about dog training while helping your new buddy. Just make sure you’re always using humane, compassionate, positive-reinforcement based training strategies that won’t frighten your visiting pooch.

Collecting dog data for the shelter. Foster homes give shelters the opportunity to learn more about a dog’s behavior in a home setting. Be ready to provide detailed information about your foster pup’s personality, preferences, and behavior. A foster parent’s data collection will help ensure that the dog gets matched with a good family fit.

Fosters help find forever homes. The most important job of a pet foster parent is to help their foster find their forever family! This often will involve taking the dog to shelter-organized adoption events and speaking with potential adopters to determine if they’re a good fit for your pooch. There’s a full guide on how to get your foster dog adopted at K9 of Mine with more tips on promoting your pup!

How Can I Become a Dog Foster? 

The basic path required to becoming a dog foster can vary depending on the specific shelter or rescue you are working with. However,  some of the most common requirements include:

  • Fill out paperwork about your living situation. Shelters usually want to get a better understanding of your experience with dogs, your living space (do you have roommates? Do you have a fenced-in backyard?) and potentially even your financial status.
  • Complete a basic dog-care course. Many shelters have a short, simple online course or video you’ll be asked to watch to ensure you understand how to properly care for your foster dog.
  • Attend an orientation. Most shelters will have some kind of orientation to get you up to speed on the rules and regulations around the organization’s foster program.

Becoming a dog foster is a great way to help out your local animal shelter while getting to spend time with some amazing doggos! Help deserving dogs find their forever homes while learning about a variety of different dogs.

We hope this foster guide has been helpful – reach out to your local animal rescue or shelter today and ask about becoming a foster today!

Wondering if You Should Foster a Dog? Yes – And Here’s How!

Note: This is an abbreviated version of an article originally published on K9 of Mine, re-published here with permission. You can read the original piece “How to Become a Dog Foster: Providing a Temporary Home for Canines in Need!” at K9 of Mine.

Fostering a dog is a great way to help out shelter & rescue dogs in need – plus it allows you to spend time with a great four-footer without the full lifetime commitment of adopting a pet. 

Every dog deserves a place where they can feel loved and cared for while waiting for their forever home!

Becoming a foster dog parent is incredibly rewarding, but there are a few things into consideration before committing to taking in a shelter pup in need. Don’t worry – we’ll explain everything you need to know!

How Do Fosters Help Shelter Dogs? 

Becoming a dog foster is one of the most impactful things you can do for a local shelter. Foster homes are in need for a variety of reasons including: 

1. Shelter space is tight, and fosters can free up room

Fostering a dog allows a dog to move into your home, freeing up room at rescue organizations — including both “kill” and “no-kill” shelters — so that your local shelter or rescue can take in more dogs who need help. Without caring foster homes, many shelters would be unable to take in new animals. This can result in neglectful owners dumping dogs on highways, or worse.

2. Foster can provide hospice care

For poor pups on their last leg, a dog foster can provide a warm, loving, caring environment for the dog to spend his final days. No dog deserves to leave this world in a stressful, loud shelter environment.

3. Fosters provide a safe space for puppies (until they’re old enough to be adopted)

Foster homes allow puppies to grow up in a relaxing environment, away from the noise and chaos of shelter life. Puppies are like little sponges, and spending their first months on earth in a stressful shelter environment can have a significant and undesirable impact on their disposition as adult dogs. 

A shelter provides minimal chances for exposure and puppy socialization with the larger world, which can result in a fearful, nervous adult dog. 

Fostering a litter of puppies can mean setting up a whole group of dogs for success! 

4. Fosters allow shy dogs to blossom

Shy and timid dogs desperately require a quiet, peaceful environment to help blossom and come out of their shells. Dog fosters allow sensitive canines to get away from the loud kennel environment and provide these pooches with the patience and care needed to feel safe and show their true colors. 

Foster parents of shy dogs will want to focus on building the dog’s confidence through various exercises and gentle training activities to help a nervous dog feel more at-ease and sure of themselves.

5. Fosters provide extra care to sick dogs while they recover

Dogs recovering from sickness or injury are often placed in a foster home to help the dog heal and recover more quickly while also keeping the shelter hygienic and limit the risk of exposure to other dogs. 

6. Fosters can collect more information about a dog’s behavior and demeanor in a home setting

Foster homes offer an excellent opportunity for shelters to better understand a dog’s behavior and general habits. How does a dog handle cats, other dogs, or kiddos? Is the dog potty trained? Does he like toys? Does he prefer to be left alone or is he a huge cuddle bug?

Collecting this information for the shelter will allow the organization to share this info with would-be adopters and help a dog get matched with his perfect home. 

7. Fosters provide a haven if shelters become temporarily unable to care for animals

If a shelter is affected by a natural disaster, canine foster parents can help keep dogs safe temporarily while the shelter is repaired and made habitable. 

Ultimately, foster homes give dogs a better place to live. Dogs in foster homes receive much more individualized attention and care than they might otherwise receive in a crowded shelter.

Many dogs behave much better in a quiet foster home than they do in a shelter, thereby increasing the chances that they’ll find a forever family. 

Fostering a Dog: The Good and the Bad 

Fostering a dog is like any other experience, with advantages and disadvantages. Let’s explore some of the key pros and cons.

Pros of Fostering:

  • You get to spend time with a dog. The best part of fostering is that you get to spend time with a new furry friend! You will be helping the dog grow into their best self, which can be very fulfilling.
  • You’ll be supporting your local animal shelter or rescue. One of the greatest advantages in fostering a dog is the help it will provide in supporting your local shelter or rescue. Shelters and rescue groups rely on the generosity of animal fosters in order to help dogs in need and free up space. This is a great way to support your local community!
  • You’ll help a dog find their forever home. Fostering can feel bittersweet at times, but there’s nothing more rewarding than handing off your foster dog to his forever family, knowing you made a pivotal impact on a pup who needed help.
  • Foster dogs can keep your own dog company. Foster dogs are an awesome way to give your own pup some company (if you have a pet at home). In some cases, having another dog in the home can be a game-changer for dogs suffering from separation anxiety (although it won’t be a fix for all dogs). Foster dogs are also a great option for anyone who is not quite ready for the lifetime commitment of a pet, but wants to give dog ownership a trial run.

Cons of Fostering:

  • Saying goodbye can be tough. When it’s time for a dog to move on to their forever home, saying goodbye can be emotionally difficult. While this can feel sad, you can be happy knowing it was YOU who helped a dog in need find a wonderful home. 
  • Foster dogs aren’t always easy to care for. Shelters and rescue groups do their best to provide fosters with information regarding a dog’s background, but in many cases shelter dogs come with an unknown history. Some have challenging issues, such as living formerly as a yard-only dog, or other past trauma that can make life difficult for them. Be ready to show kindness and compassion towards your canine guest, and help them adjust to their new life while preparing for a better future.

What Does a Dog Foster Do?

Dog fosters are wonderful people who make a huge difference in the lives of dogs. Dog fosters play a big part in giving shelter dogs a good life, while also making room in shelters so more dogs can be saved from being put down.

But what – on a day-to-day basis – does a dog foster parent do?

In addition to basic caretaking responsibilities, dog fosters will be responsible for the following:

Basic training and manners. Ideally, you’ll spend some time teaching your foster dog basic manners and obedience training for in-the-home. This isn’t required, but it’s highly recommended and part of what’s expected of a responsible foster. This may involve potty training, basic commands like sit and stay, etc. Some shelters will even cover the cost of classes for you to learn about dog training while helping your new buddy. Just make sure you’re always using humane, compassionate, positive-reinforcement based training strategies that won’t frighten your visiting pooch.

Collecting dog data for the shelter. Foster homes give shelters the opportunity to learn more about a dog’s behavior in a home setting. Be ready to provide detailed information about your foster pup’s personality, preferences, and behavior. A foster parent’s data collection will help ensure that the dog gets matched with a good family fit.

Fosters help find forever homes. The most important job of a pet foster parent is to help their foster find their forever family! This often will involve taking the dog to shelter-organized adoption events and speaking with potential adopters to determine if they’re a good fit for your pooch. There’s a full guide on how to get your foster dog adopted at K9 of Mine with more tips on promoting your pup!

How Can I Become a Dog Foster? 

The basic path required to becoming a dog foster can vary depending on the specific shelter or rescue you are working with. However,  some of the most common requirements include:

  • Fill out paperwork about your living situation. Shelters usually want to get a better understanding of your experience with dogs, your living space (do you have roommates? Do you have a fenced-in backyard?).
  • Complete a basic dog-care course. Many shelters have a short, simple online course or video you’ll be asked to watch to ensure you understand how to properly care for your foster dog.
  • Attend an orientation. Most shelters will have some kind of orientation to get you up to speed on the rules and regulations around the organization’s foster program.

Becoming a dog foster is a great way to help out your local animal shelter while getting to spend time with some amazing doggos! Help deserving dogs find their forever homes while learning about a variety of different dogs.

We hope this foster guide has been helpful – reach out to your local animal shelter or rescue today and ask about becoming a foster today!

How to know if you’re ready for a new pet

I don’t know about you, but when I think of home, three things come to mind.

First is my kids.

Second is my pets.

Third is my husband (yes, he knows about his place in the hierarchy!)

They say that home is where the heart is, but I think of home as where my loved ones are, so it’s always exciting when you get the chance to increase the number of loved ones at home.

Proper Timing

That said, it’s not always the best time to bring a new pet home. It might be right for you, but it might not be right for the new pet, your kids, or your existing pets. For this reason, I thought it’d be great to discuss a few ways for you to know if you’re ready for a new pet.

Some considerations you should make…

Before you bring a new pet home, there are a few things that you will need to consider (in fact, quite a few). It’s important that you meet the below criteria before bringing a new fur baby (or furless baby) home.

  • Ensure you have a stable schedule. No matter which pet you bring home with you, you should be able to spend adequate time with them. Remember, domestic animals require love and attention to thrive and lead a happy life. If you’re someone who travels frequently, your lifestyle may not be suitable for a pet’s needs.
  • Ensure you have the budget for a new pet. Pets can be costly; you should have the budget available to cover the cost of your pets. Keep in mind that your budget should include unplanned costs, such as vet bills and medicine.
  • Ensure that this isn’t a spur-of-the-moment decision. Bringing a new pet home is an exciting experience, though that “high” that we get from bringing a new pet home shouldn’t be the motivating factor behind the decision.
  • Ensure that you have sufficient space for your new pet. Like all living things, your pet will need sufficient space to thrive. A prime example of this is huskies, whose mental health, as well as their physical health, are directly dependent on the amount of exercise they get. Without sufficient exercise or space to exercise, they can become aggressive.
  • Ensure that you have the right equipment. Adding new pets to your home might also mean adding or updating equipment. For example, if you are planning on introducing new fish, you may need to upscale your tank, and therefore upscale what goes with it. If you are going big and getting a 30 gallon tank you will need a 30 gallon fish tank heater to match.
  • Ensure it’s the right fit for everyone. The decision to bring a new pet home is a big one. It is incredibly important that you, your family, and your existing pets are all on board with a new addition to the family. It’s also important to ensure that the new member of the family feels at home. Meet and greets are a great way to test the water with new pets, allowing everyone the opportunity to get to know each other before making any commitments.
  • Ensure you’re not trying to fill a gap. Loss is hard to deal with. That said, using a pet as a temporary crutch to assist with the grieving process seldom ends well. While pets are great companions, they can’t fill a hole in a heart. It’s recommended that you first deal with your loss before bringing a new pet home, especially if the recent loss was of a pet.
  • Ensure the safety and happiness of your other pets. Some pets just aren’t suited to sharing a living space. Fish or birds, for example, can become incredibly stressed out simply in the presence of a natural predator, such as cats. It’s important to ensure that your current pet’s health, wellness, and happiness are not affected by the arrival of a new pet.

Ensure that you have done your research. I’ve tried my best to cover everything I can above, but it is best to ensure that you have done your homework before you introduce a new pet to your home. Only once you’re confident that your decision is logical and that you can meet every need of your new pet, should you begin the process of bringing one home.

How to Open Your Heart and Home to a Pandemic Pet 

How to Open Your Heart and Home to a Pandemic Pet 

There haven’t been a lot of bright spots during the pandemic but the fact that more people are welcoming homeless pets into their home is something we can all celebrate! If you are thinking about adopting a new furry family member to keep you company in lockdown, there are a few basic tips and resources you should keep in mind. So, whether you plan on adopting one of the available pets from Pacific Pups Rescue or another rescue, here’s what you need to know. 

 

Let’s Start By Getting Your Home Ready 

 

When you bring your buddy home for the first night, the last thing you want is for him to escape or swallow something dangerous. So spend some time preparing your home for the new pet. 

 

  • You’ll need some pet basics at home, like safe spots to rest and eat. 
  • Finding a pro to help to put up a fence can also keep your pet protected. 
  • Your pup might also appreciate having a little relaxation space of his own. 
  • Just be sure to remove any potential hazards, including plants and candies. 

 

Now It’s Time to Go Shopping for Supplies 

 

With your home organized and a safe space set up for your new furkid, you can move on to picking out a few essentials to keep him healthy and comfortable. 

 

 

Not Ready to Adopt? Foster Instead! 

 

We’ll be the first to tell you that getting a pet is a lifetime commitment. But if you’re not up for commitment just yet, you can still help pets during the pandemic by fostering! 

 

 

If you need a little more love and joy in your lockdown life, consider adopting a new dog or cat! The resources above will help you prepare for your new furry family member, but also know that you can foster if you’re not ready to commit. Either way, you’ll be helping a homeless animal! 

 

Photo Credit: Unsplash

Article by: Aurora James

PPR and the Pandemic! (What we’ve been up to)

Hello!

  Its been awhile since we posted a blog, and we wanted to update you all on what we’ve been up to at PPR!

  Since the pandemic started, we have been busy rescuing over 100 dogs and cats! We have had so many people step forward wanting to help with fostering, which has been the silver lining in all of this. All of the new pups and kitties have certainly kept us very busy!

Of course, with all of these dogs and cats came very hefty vet bills, and we’ve had so many generous donors throughout all of this, as well as relied on the sales of our dog toy line, Pacific Pups Products. 

We’ve adopted out record numbers of dogs and cats, all to great homes. Even a lot of our longest residents found their forever homes! 

We just started back up filming with the Hallmark channel again. We are grateful to be back showcasing our adoptable dogs on Home & Family – you may have seen Chiquito and King featured on recent episodes: 

Chiquito’s Hallmark Debut!

King’s Hallmark Debut!

We have also released 2 new lines of our Pacific Pups Products dog toys, which is what supports our rescue! 

You can check them out in these two Amazon links:

The largest dog rope toy on Amazon: 

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=dog+toys+for+aggressive+chewers+dog+rope+toy+for+large+dog&field-brand=PACIFIC%20PUPS%20PRODUCTS%20SUPPORTING%20PACIFICPUPRESCUE.COM&field-asin=B08C7F79JD

Our new, fun 18 pack: 

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=dog+toys+for+aggressive+chewers+dog+rope+toy+for+small+dog+rope+chew+toy+puppy+chew+toy&field-brand=PACIFIC%20PUPS%20PRODUCTS%20SUPPORTING%20PACIFICPUPRESCUE.COM&field-asin=B0876PRL18

So thank you to everyone who has either adopted, fostered, donated and/or volunteered with us during all of this craziness – we couldn’t have rescued this many animals without you.

 

*We are still a long way from paying off our vet bills, so if you’d like to make a donation, you can do so in the Donate & Volunteer tab

Our Pups & Michael B. Jordan

Our Pumpkin Spice Latte litter are famous! Three of the puppies were asked to spend the afternoon with Michael B. Jordan, as he answered fan questions about his new blockbuster movie, Creed II, in a Buzzfeed celebrity interview.

We know the puppies had a lot of fun, and we think Michael B did, too!

Check out the full interview in the link below!

 

Michael B. Jordan Plays with Pacific Pups Rescue puppies!

Become a Foster!

Being a foster is very rewarding. You save a life. That dog or cat would not have made it out of the shelter if you hadn’t stepped up to be a foster. A rescue cannot save another dog from the high-kill shelter, from the street, or from a desperate situation, if there is no foster.

Yes fostering is rewarding, but what exactly does a foster do?

A foster takes care of a dog or cat until he or she gets adopted, or for as long as you can.  We ask you take care of this animal, and help it to learn what its like to be part of a family.  We have an adoption fair 3 weekends out of the month, in which we show our dogs and cats so that the public can meet them.

Pacific Pups Rescue will provide you with everything you need to take care of this dog or cat, so that your foster animals is at no expense to you. We provide you with all food, supplies, and cover medical needs.

We have dogs and cats of all breeds, ages, and sizes, with different personalities and energy levels! We will find the right match for you!

WHY BECOME A FOSTER?

You save a life.

You want to volunteer with animals hands on.

Can’t afford a pet but love an animal’s companionship.

Don’t have the time to dedicate to an animal or cannot make a lifetime commitment, but want an animal’s companionship.

You don’t know if you’re ready, or if your kids or family members are ready, for the responsibility of a pet. Its a good test run.

You don’t know if the dog or cat you’re interested in will be a good fit. This is a trial run!

You are a college student and want an animal’s friendship, but know you are only living in town temporarily.

 

There are so many reasons to become a foster. Please visit our Foster Page today, to sign up to be a foster!